Bison Quest Adventure Vacation Blog

We offer the most exclusive Bison and Wildlife Adventure anywhere!

November 19, 2017

Filed under: bison,ecology — bisonquest @ 6:30 pm
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There’s a reason that bison have such big heads (a bull head can weigh up to 200 lbs).  They can forage through 1- 2 feet of snow by using their head to push snow aside to reach any vegetation underneath.

Moving snow

Using their massive heads, bison can reach vegetation below snow.

Here Gigi is finding some green grass under the snow that grew as a result of our fall rains .

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Bison – how do you tell them apart? We’ll start at the beginning with the calves and their horns! January 12, 2015

When guests come to visit, Craig introduces them to all of the herd cows by name.  And that leads everyone to ask, “How can you tell them apart?”  Well, the simple answer is the same as your answer to this question, “How do you tell your friends from each other?”  Because they all have individual characteristics that are unique to them.  Of course, if you aren’t used to looking for those characteristics, they’re hard to see (I have Caucasian friends that tell me they can’t tell Asians apart, and I have Asian friends who tell me that all white folks look the same :).   It’s just a matter of knowing how to look for those differences.  So I figured I’d do a series showing how we identify our buffs!

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Brand new baby – can’t see horns but you can feel them (if mom would let you)

And since horns are probably the characteristic that most folks look at first, we’ll start there with a look at age classes.  And to do that, let’s begin at the beginning.  The calves!

The one sleeping on the left is a newborn.  If you could touch the top of her head, you would feel the tiniest little bumps that will become her horns. And you would really feel some horns when her mom caught you doing that!

The next calf picture (sniffing my fingers) has little horn buds that are just showing up above the curly wool.

The little black faced “red” calf is about 4 months old,

and the last is a six month old calf.  I think their little horns make them look like devils!

 

 

 

 

You can just see the little horn buds (this baby is about a month old)

You can just see the little horn buds (this baby is about a month old)

This is a 4 month old calf (they're not usually still red when we have snow on the ground, but this was an October calf!)

This is a 4 month old calf (they’re not usually still red when we have snow on the ground, but this was an October calf!)

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And here is a six month old calf, looking a little “devilish”!

 

 

Merry Christmas, from all of us at Bison Quest (and no, this isn’t photo shopped!) December 25, 2014

Filed under: About Us,Amusing,bison — bisonquest @ 4:13 pm
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???????????????Nope, it’s not photo shopped – but it also didn’t stay on very long :)!  Merry Christmas!

 

Bison Quest Christmas Carols – “Going on a hay ride together with you.” December 22, 2014

Filed under: Amusing,bison,wildlife — bisonquest @ 3:12 pm
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P1040504 (1024x768)

 

Bison Quest Christmas Carols continue with “Dashing Through the Snow”” December 13, 2014

Filed under: bison,Musings — bisonquest @ 4:08 pm
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Dashing Through the Snow

Dashing Through the Snow

And for those who want to see this in action, check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7dp8NYiJSo

 

Bison Quest Christmas Carols continue – A Hay in a Stranger December 8, 2014

A Hay In a Stranger

A Hay In a Stranger

 

“Glamping With Bison at a Gorgeous Montana Ranch” hot off the Yahoo Travel press!

We thoroughly enjoyed Jo Piazza’s visit and resulting article about our Bison Quest Wildlife Vacations!

Jo Piazza 030 (1280x720)

Glamping With Bison at a Gorgeous Montana Ranch Run by Scientists

 

 
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